Arcapita

Arcapita And Mumtalakat Acquire NAS United Healthcare Services

Arcapita and Bahrain Mumtalakat Holding Company have partnered to acquire an approximately 90% stake in NAS United Healthcare Services (NAS). Arcapita is a global Shari'ah compliant alternative investment manager. Mumtalakat is the sovereign wealth fund of the Kingdom of Bahrain. Abu Dhabi-based NAS is a regional leader in the provision of third-party administrator services to more than 40 health insurance and takaful companies in the Arabian Gulf. NAS services a pool of more than 500,000 insured members and processes more than 3 million medical claims per year. The market for outsourced medical claims management in the GCC region is expected to grow significantly. Most GCC governments have either implemented mandatory healthcare insurance coverage or plan to launch initiatives in the next 2 to 3 years.

Bahrain's Arcapita acquires $100m logistics park in Dubai

Global investment management firm Arcapita has acquired a logistics park in Dubai for a total transaction value of approximately $100 million.The investment comprises nine freehold plots of land in the Al Quoz Industrial area covering an area of approximately 630,000 square feet, located next to Al Khail Road. The site will consist of 10 completed warehousing facilities that will be under a long term master lease with a UAE conglomerate. Martin Tan, Arcapita’s chief investment officer, expects Dubai’s logistics market to experience growth, driven by its geographical location and legislation.

Arcapita acquires $85m real estate portfolio

Arcapita has partnered with Morningstar Senior Living for senior living communities based in Colorado worth $85 million. The current portfolio for Arcapita consists of three projects for assisted living and care communities and provides a total of 196 units and 243 licensed beds in the Denver and Colorado Springs, Colorado. The focus on the state is to attract customers who are in the company’s target age demographic. The target age group for senior living facilities in Colorado is projected to grow by almost twice the national average over the next five years, stated Martin Tan, Arcapita’s chief investment officer.

Bahrain's Arcapita and Saudi's Al Rajhi Capital exit real estate fund

Bahrain-based Arcapita has sold real estate assets it jointly held with Saudi Arabia's Al Rajhi Capital for 1.35 billion Saudi riyals ($359.81 million), the two companies said in a joint statement. The ARC Real Estate Fund, which had a lifespan of five years, acquired seven assets in logistics, warehousing and retail in Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates, they said in the statement. The fund appointed an external consultant to advise on the sale in April. They did not say who they had sold the assets to. Al Rajhi Capital is the investment banking arm of Saudi Arabian lender, Al Rajhi Bank.

Arcapita on investments in Saadiyat and beyond

Arcapita recently acquired Phase One of Saadiyat Beach Residences, a premium residential apartment complex in Saadiyat, Abu Dhabi, for a reported $200 million. Built by Mubadala Development Co., the complex boasts three low-rise buildings in a gated community developed in 2013. It is under a three-year master lease to the Tourism Development & Investment Co. Arcapita has been actively sourcing for new real estate deals within the region, which includes Abu Dhabi. The firm's current focus sectors are residential and logistics. Additionally, on a global basis, Arcapita looks forward to closing a number of real estate and private equity transactions in the coming months.

Buyout firm Arcapita sells $640m US real estate portfolio

Bahrain-based Islamic investment firm Arcapita said on Wednesday it had sold its real estate portfolio of retirement communities across the United States to NorthStar Healthcare Income Trust for $640 million. The portfolio includes 16 facilities and 4,000 residential units for continuing senior care. Net operating income from the portfolio grew by 41 per cent between 2010 and 2014, despite a slump in the U.S. housing market following the 2008 financial crisis. Abdulmalik said the firm has given $3 billion in exit proceeds to its investors in the last two years but did not give a breakdown of profits for its real estate portfolio exit. In November, Arcapita completed a $100 million fundraising, a little over a year after emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

Buyout firm Arcapita sells $640 mln U.S. real estate portfolio

Bahrain-based Islamic investment firm Arcapita said on Wednesday it had sold its real estate portfolio of retirement communities across the United States to NorthStar Healthcare Income Trust for $640 million. The portfolio includes 16 facilities and 4,000 residential units for continuing senior care. Net operating income from the portfolio grew by 41 percent between 2010 and 2014, despite a slump in the U.S. housing market following the 2008 financial crisis. Abdulmalik said the firm has given $3 billion in exit proceeds to its investors in the last two years but did not give a breakdown of profits for its real estate portfolio exit. In November, Arcapita completed a $100 million fundraising, a little over a year after emerging from Chapter 11 bankruptcy driven by debt repayment difficulties.

Bahrain's Arcapita: Rising from the ashes

One of the reasons the Gulf has been so slow to introduce bankruptcy legislation is because there is still a stigma associated with the process. While some of the biggest companies and business names in the West have gone through the process, in the Arab world it is still seen as taboo and a major cultural failure. One company that has gone through the process, come out the other side and is slowly beginning to scratch away at the doomsday perception associated with bankruptcy is Bahrain-owned, US-based firm Arcapita. Atif Abdulmalik, chief executive, believes the Arcapita experience should be seen as an example to authorities in the region who might be reluctant to push ahead with the introduction of similar procedures in the Arab world for fear of the taboo associated with it.

Bahrain’s Arcapita Raises $100 Million After Exiting Chapter 11

Bahrain’s Arcapita Bank BSC has raised $100 million from shareholders to fund a return to dealmaking a year after it emerged from bankruptcy. The new equity will be used to fund Shariah compliant private equity and real-estate investments in Saudi Arabia, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, Oman and Kuwait. Arcapita will also look at U.S., Asian and European investments at a later stage. Arcapita emerged from bankruptcy in September 2013 after securing a $350 million loan from Goldman Sachs Group. Under the terms of its debt restructuring, a new company called RA Holding Corp. was created to manage Arcapita’s $3 billion of assets. Arcapita earned $10.1 million in the fiscal year ended June, mostly from fees for managing RA on behalf of creditors.

CORRECTED-Islamic investment banks in Gulf eye slimmed-down future

The financial crisis has changed the focus for Bahraini investment banks away from bumper projects and the preference now is for slimmer balance sheets, according to GFH founder Essam Janahi, who last week stepped down as chairman. GFH has now reduced its liabilities to $223 million, from over $2 billion at the peak of the crisis, and is rolling out a more conservative strategy. Future investments will shy away from aggressive rates of return and favour smaller deals to better manage risk, Janahi said. Even some Islamic investment banks which rode out the global crisis fairly comfortably have streamlined their operations and say they will not spurn relatively small deals. Qatar's QInvest for example has streamlined operations and discontinued areas such as wealth management and brokerage services.

Islamic banks seek realistic ambitions

The financial crisis changed the focus of Bahraini investment banks away from bumper projects and the preference now is for slimmer balance sheets, according to GFH founder Essam Janahi, who last week stepped down as chairman. GFH has now reduced its liabilities to $223 million, from over $2bn at the peak of the crisis, and is rolling out a more conservative strategy. Future investments will shy away from aggressive rates of return and favour smaller deals to better manage risk, Mr Janahi said. Bahraini firm Arcapita filed for bankruptcy protection in a New York court in March last year, emerging from Chapter 11 last month with a five-year plan to sell legacy assets to pay creditors. Last week, the reorganised firm appointed a new seven-man board of directors that includes a representative from Bahrain's central bank and the chief executive of Bank Alkhair.

Investment firm Arcapita emerges from US bankruptcy

Islamic investment firm Arcapita is the first Gulf company to emerge from U.S. bankruptcy under Chapter 11 rules. Arcapita’s plan is to transfer its assets into a new holding company which will dispose of them over time to pay off creditors and gradually wind-down the firm. Arcapita’s creditors include Barclays, CIMB, Royal Bank of Scotland, Standard Bank, Standard Chartered and the Central Bank of Bahrain – its largest creditor with $255.1 million owed.

Arcapita Seeks More Time to Rally Support for Chapter 11 Plan

Bahrain's Arcapita Bank is seeking more time under U.S. bankruptcy court protection as it continues talks with its creditors over the details of its plan to wind down its portfolio companies. In a filing Tuesday in New York, Arcapita's lawyers asked U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Sean Lane to approve an extension of its exclusive right to lobby creditors for support of its plan through July 7. The current solicitation period ends April 9.

European Islamic Investment Bank Sells Arcapita Facility for $8.1 Million

The European Islamic Investment Bank PLC (EIIB.LN) said Tuesday it has sold a financing facility provided to Arcapita for $8.1 million in cash to Barclays Bank. The facility, dating from 2007, formed part of a syndicated loan facility which was due for repayment in March 2012. However, Arcapita defaulted on its payment obligations and in early 2012 announced that it had filed for Chapter 11 protection in the U.S. The sale will result in a total charge of $6.9 million in the results to December 2012.

Arcapita planning to liquidate assets

Bahrain-based Arcapita Bank is planning to liquidate its assets, and will not seek out new investors or investments, according to its reorganisation plan. Creditors will be given equity in two new companies that hold all the assets of Arcapita and several related companies. The proposal also envisions a new $550 million sukuk to be issued to the unsecured creditors. The reorganisation plan will be submitted to creditors for a vote and to the US court for confirmation.

Arcapita's plan to exit bankruptcy

In order to exit bankruptcy, Arcapita has designed a long-term business plan which is to be combined with a previously approved incentive plan with employees. According to the latter plan, terminated employees and such, who remained with the company through November, will have the opportunity to settle the amounts they owed Arcapita from an incentive plan that allowed them to co-invest with Arcapita in portfolio companies. The incentive was made possible by an affiliate of Arcapita which loans the company money in order for Arcapita to invest in its deals.

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Arcapita's district cooling investment in jeopardy

Arcapita Islamic investment bank, which finds itselb in Chapter 11 bankrupcty, plans a new financial move. It will make a $1.9m Murabaha financing with a profit rate of 15% possible. The money will flow into District Cooling - a joint venture with Dalkia Utilities Company serving for district cooling and other services to three developments in Bahrain and Abu Dhabi. The financing is supposed to play the role of a bridge. Meanwhile Arcapita and District Cooling are occupied to renegotiate a concession agreement with Abu Dhabi’s Tourism Development & Investment Company (TDIC).

Arcapita’ J.Jill suffers another ratings downgrade

Moody’s has downgraded Arcapita from B2 to B3 as the retailer’s sales stumbled and the significant leverage involved in the deal weighs on the company’s earnings. The outlook on the rating seems to be negative.
Moody’s re-rating comes after a similar downgrade from S&P in September, which dropped its rating on the loan from a B to a CCC with a negative outlook based on the risk that the company will breach its debt covenants.

London Fire Brigade partner AssetCo snubs Arcapita bid approach

AssetCo Plc rejected what it called an opportunistic takeover approach from Islamic investment firm Arcapita , and said it received a new loan from its principal bank.
AssetCo, which is valued at 14 million pounds, is the only company to have a fully outsourced fire and rescue service in the Middle East.

Arcapita to conduct rights issue

The investment firm Arcapita has said it is conducting a rights issue to raise fresh funds from shareholders, as it prepares to refinance a $1.1bn loan due next year.
The firm also plans to market the rights issue to new institutional investors in the Gulf region, Malaysia and other parts of Asia.

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