Financial Institutions

Fitch: Tougher operating environment challenges #Saudi Islamic banks

According to Fitch Ratings, a tougher operating environment is continuing to challenge Saudi Islamic banks. Sustained low oil prices have taken their toll on economic growth and government spending and this affects certain sectors. Asset-quality metrics are likely to deteriorate from their current strong position due to slower Islamic financing growth. Islamic banks accounted for about 43% of the sector at end-1H16, up from 36.6% in 1H15. There are 12 licensed commercial banks in Saudi Arabia. Four are fully sharia-compliant, with the rest providing a mix of sharia-compliant and conventional banking products. The performance and credit matrices of Islamic and conventional banks are similar in many ways due to the largely Islamic finance nature of the lending market in Saudi Arabia.

Silk Bank to grow in Islamic banking

#Pakistan's Silk Bank plans to expand its Islamic banking business amid growing demand for Shariah-compliant financial products in the country. The State Bank of Pakistan has given approval to the bank for opening of 20 Islamic and 15 conventional branches this year. Silk Bank CEO Shaukat Tarin said the bank was going to reduce the size of corporate banking, but increase consumer and SME segments. The bank’s consumer banking portfolio continued to grow, while its non-performing loans fell by Rs10 billion in January-June 2017. The bank also made its commitment to revive the mortgage business in the current low interest rate environment. Shuja Alvi, head of investment at Silk Bank, said the bank continued to make heavy investments. Since acquisition, the sponsors have invested Rs430 billion in the bank through multiple funding.

Conditions Conducive for Islamic Finance Expansion in #Morocco- Al Baraka Bank

Bahrain’s Al Baraka Bank deems that the regulatory framework in Morocco is conducive for the launch of an Islamic finance venture. The Bank’s Chief Executive, Adnan Ahmed Yousif said Al Baraka targets the expanding Islamic finance in Morocco in effort to diversify assets and revenues in Africa. Morocco is attractive for Islamic banks because of a competitive landscape that is free from large western lenders. Yousif added that reforms were being considered, but complete tax neutrality towards Islamic finance contracts was still needed. Bahrain’s Al Baraka group forged a partnership with Morocco’s BMCE Bank of Africa to create AL Baraka Maroc, which aims at creating a network of 25 agencies in Morocco.

#Indonesia, the next big #market for Dubai Islamic Bank?

In this interview Dr. Adnan Chilwan, CEO of Dubai Islamic Bank (DIB), speaks about the Indonesian market and the positioning of Dubai Islamic Bank. In March 2017 Indonesia’s Bank Panin Syariah rebranded to Panin Dubai Syariah Bank (PDSB) and DIB holds a 40% interest. Dr. Chilwan believes Indonesia has great potential and the regulator is quite supportive of Islamic finance. In his view, the success of DIB is the result of its change in positioning. The bank has not compromised Shari’ah, but has a better understanding of customer needs. DIB is competing with the largest players within every region and is aiming at full inclusion to bank everyone.

Barwa Bank almost finishes review of #merger recommendations

Barwa Bank has almost finished legal and financial studies regarding its merger with Masraf Al Rayyan and International Bank of Qatar (IBQ). Barwa Bank CEO Khalid al-Subea said that any development in this regard will be announced through a joint statement by the three banks. Barwa Bank's recent Al Majd initiative offers its clients an exceptional banking package within the framework of various ongoing national initiatives. Barwa Bank also announced the launch of its new Shariah-compliant savings account that offers high flexibility and profit rate of an expected 3%, where profits are paid on a quarterly basis. The account allows clients to withdraw once every quarter up to 25% of the current balance.

#Nigerian Banks Should Embrace Islamic Finance, By Rafiq Raji

In August 2017, the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) introduced two liquidity management instruments for non-interest financial institutions, a Funding for Liquidity Facility (FfLF) and Intra-day Facility (IDF). In a February 2017 report, the IMF mentioned the lack of such sharp liquidity instruments as a key risk to the financial systems of countries where there are Islamic banks. Therefore, the CBN’s recent move is a welcome development. More Nigerian banks would be wise to have Islamic banking windows, but they must be mindful of some potential pitfalls. Customers might be sceptical about whether the bank is truly able to separate its Islamic banking arm from its interest-earning entities. There is also the possibility of regulatory arbitrage, where the bank potentially transfers risk between the two arms, depending on which is favourable. The CBN seems well-geared to handle such potential abuses.

Al Hilal Bank opens its first client service branch in Almaty, #Kazakhstan

Al Hilal Bank opened its first client service branch in Almaty, which provides a full range of Shari'ah compliant banking services for corporate and private customers. Bank customers can now use deposit products, debit cards, and cash management services, while the investment deposits are a new and unique product for the market of Kazakhstan. Focusing on the needs of customers, the bank plans on launching a programme to finance individuals in the near future. Speaking at the branch opening, Gordon Haskins, CEO of Al Hilal Bank Kazakhstan, said that Islamic finance had a great potential for development and Al Hilal Bank aimed to bring benefits and establish benchmarking of Islamic financial instruments in the region. Al Hilal was established in 2010 as the first Islamic bank in Kazakhstan and the CIS region. It is a subsidiary bank of Al Hilal Bank PJSC, which is fully owned by the Government of the United Arab Emirates.

ICD gets active in Africa to widen Islamic finance appeal

The Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD) is planning to increase its activities in Africa to widen the appeal of Islamic finance across the region. ICD chief executive Khaled Al-Aboodi said the ICD was helping develop Islamic finance channels, that is Islamic banks, investment and ijara companies, takaful and retakaful firms. Africa represents around 12% of the ICD’s cumulative investment approvals and this figure is expected to rise in coming years. Some of the projects will be led by Senegal-based Tamweel Africa, jointly owned by the ICD and Turkey’s Bank Asya. Tamweel already holds stakes in Islamic banks in Senegal, Niger, Guinea and Mauritania. Further Islamic banks will be established in Benin, Mali and Chad. In Tunisia, the ICD has teamed up with the newly created sovereign wealth fund, Caisse de Dépôts de Tunisie, to set up a $30 million (R315m) fund to support businesses. The ICD also hoped to improve access to sharia-compliant financing for small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) across Muslim countries, Al-Aboodi said.

Moody’s Upgrades Dubai Islamic Bank Ratings

Moody’s Investors Service has upgraded Dubai Islamic Bank’s (DIB) local and foreign currency long-term issuer ratings to A3 from Baa1. The outlook for the bank has been changed from positive to stable. Moody's also upgraded the bank’s baseline credit assessment (BCA), adjusted BCA as well as the long and short-term counterparty risk assessment. The primary driver for the BCA upgrade is the bank’s significant improvement in its asset quality and provisioning coverage. The upgrade also captures DIB’s improving profitability in recent years, with return on assets (ROA) improving to 2.0% for 2016. DIB said that its net income rose 13.8% in the second quarter to Dh1.1 billion compared with Dh929 million in the same period last year. Going forward, the rating agency expects that the bank’s net profitability may face modest pressure, due to increased funding costs, but that it will remain above the domestic average and global median.

Zaman-Bank becomes #Kazakhstan’s second Islamic Bank

Kazakhstan’s previously commercial Zaman-Bank became an official Islamic bank on Aug. 17. The license from the National Bank of Kazakhstan allows the bank to tap into the Islamic banking sector and makes Zaman-Bank the second Islamic bank in the country. Al Hilal Bank, operating since 2010, had been the country’s only Islamic bank so far. Zaman-Bank is planning to focus on retail banking and small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The bank already offers a range of deposit options, including wakala and mudaraba. Head of the Islamic Finance Development Unit, Timur Rustemov, said the bank converted to an Islamic bank, because this sector is still open in Kazakhstan, especially consumer banking. He added that the bank plans to offer Islamic auto finance, Islamic mortgage and a range of products and services for SMEs.

#Qatar banks seek Asian, European funding as diplomatic crisis bites

Qatari banks are turning to Asia and Europe for funding after clients from other Arab states pulled billions of dollars from their accounts. Analysts warn that more heavy withdrawals are likely in the coming months. Qatar Islamic Bank has recently raised funds through private placement deals in Japanese yen and Australian dollars. It is now exploring more such deals in Europe and Asia, as well as a certificate of deposit program and a Murabaha facility. Many Qatari banks are facing greater urgency to secure funding since June when the United Arab Emirates, Saudi Arabia, Egypt and Bahrain imposed a boycott on Qatar, accusing it of funding terrorism. Qatar denies the allegations. The crisis has led to an outflow of around $7.5 billion in foreign customers' deposits and a further $15 billion in foreign interbank deposits and borrowings. In response, Qatar's government deposited nearly $18 billion with local banks in June and July.

EGP 11.7bn funding portfolio of #corporate finance in Abu Dhabi Islamic bank by end of June 2017

The corporate sector in #Egypt acquired EGP 11.7bn of the total loans portfolio in Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank-Egypt until the end of June 2017. The bank continued its programme to fund small and medium enterprises (SMEs). The sector continued its growth also in the field of retail banking, reaching EGP 4.3bn, whereas the volume of the portfolio managed by the treasury sector in the bank is estimated at EGP 12.2bn. Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank-Egypt revealed its business results for H1 2017, where total net profits during that period reached EGP 339m with EGP 148m increase by 78% compared to H1 2016. Total revenues reached EGP 1.841bn compared to EGP 1.225bn, with a growth of 50%. The volume of growth in total assets reached 30% by the end of June 2017 compared to June 2016. In its report the bank stressed its commitment to developing the technological infrastructure and investing in human resources.

Moody's: Islamic Development Bank benefits from strong capital, prudent risk management

According to Moody's Investors Service, Islamic Development Bank's (IsDB) credit strengths include a strong capital base, prudent financial and risk management policies. The bank's liquidity level is solid, which supports its Aaa rating and stable outlook. Moody's analyst Mathias Angonin said the weighted average rating of IsDB's shareholders is lower than other Aaa-rated development banks, but its 57 members are strongly committed to the organisation. This support is reflected in continued capital increases. The bank's paid-in capital rose to ID 5.1 billion at end-2016, from ID2.7 billion in 2007, and an additional ID 2.4 billion is expected over the next 10 years. Credit challenges include a risky operating environment as well as lower oil prices and the risks from geopolitical tensions. Nonetheless, its operational assets continue to perform well, with a very low level of impairment.

PNB mulls introduction of Islamic shares for Maybank

Permodalan Nasional Bhd (PNB) is studying a potential issuance of Islamic shares (i-shares) by Malayan Banking (Maybank). PNB group chairman Tan Sri Abdul Wahid Omar said currently about 25% of the Maybank group’s earnings come from the syariah-compliant businesses, and proposed that 20% of the group’s shares can be designated as i-shares. The move to list i-shares would provide an extra boost to the Malaysian Islamic capital market, said Abdul Wahid. He added that there are currently only two listed syariah-compliant financial institutions in Malaysia, BIMB Holdings and Syarikat Takaful Malaysia. If the plan goes through, it will create RM20 billion worth of new syariah-compliant instruments, which is three times bigger than BIMB’s market capitalisation. Abdul Wahid added that the group is looking at three asset classes for further investments overseas, namely public equities, private equities and real estate.

Tadhamon International Islamic Bank ratings affirmed

Capital Intelligence Ratings has affirmed the credit ratings of Tadhamon International Islamic Bank (TIIB), based in Sana'a, Yemen. The Bank’s Long- and Short-Term Foreign Currency Ratings (FCRs) are both maintained at 'C', reflecting the volatile operating environment and devastated economy. TIIB has confirmed to CI Ratings that it is not currently in default of any obligations. All ratings remain on a 'Negative' Outlook. The rating is supported by adequate liquidity. Real estate and other investments outside of Yemen represent around 40% of the balance sheet. The Support Rating is adjusted to '5' from '4' based on the low likelihood of support from shareholders and the authorities, and their ability to provide timely assistance.

Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank invests heavily in digital services

Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank (ADIB) plans to continue its current strategy based on prudence in risk management, coupled with innovation in customer experience and products. This approach is working: over the past two years, ADIB has attracted more than 100,000 new retail customers, taking its total to more than 950,000. In the first half of 2017, net profits rose more than 14.1% year-on-year to $307m. Total revenues reached $757m, up 4.1%. CEO Khamis Buharoon says the bank has now a balanced customer base, across Abu Dhabi, Dubai and the northern emirates, comprising UAE nationals, as well as Arab, Asian and Western expatriates. A number of new additions to ADIB’s range of retail and wholesale banking services are planned. According to Buharoon, ADIB's individual and corporate customer base will continue to grow and key factors remain digitisation and automation in branches.

ADIB recognised for CSR initiatives from UN Global Compact subsidiary

Abu Dhabi Islamic Bank (ADIB) has been awarded for its commitment to corporate social responsibility (CSR) from the regional CSR Network Consultancy, a member of the United Nations Global Compact initiative. The award was presented to Mohammed Al Fahim, Regional Head of Corporate Banking at ADIB. ADIB has a proven track record of CSR initiatives, including launching blood donation campaigns, sponsoring mass weddings and organising a range of activities during Ramadan. The bank adopted design principles aimed at minimising both energy and water inputs and waste outputs. In addition, ADIB Future’s Champions League was a recipient of the Gold Prize for the Best Sports CSR Initiative, and Bronze winner in the Youth Development Project of the Year at the 2017 Sports Industry Awards. ADIB also maintained its commitment to recruit, develop and promote local talent through its youth development programme.

Moody's granted licence to conduct credit #rating activities in the Kingdom of #Saudi Arabia

The Capital Market Authority (CMA) authorised Moody's Investors Service to conduct credit rating activities in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Managing Director Monica Merli welcomed the announcement, emphasizing the Kingdom's increasing prominence in the debt capital markets. Saudi Arabia is a key market for Islamic finance, an area in which Moody's is recognised as a global thought leader through ratings, research and speaking engagements at leading conferences. The Kingdom completed the world's largest ever inaugural Sukuk issuance at $9 billion in April 2017, a transaction rated A1 by Moody's. Moody's currently rates 140 issuers and 92 debt programmes across the Middle East, including leading coverage in rating Islamic financial institutions and Sukuk.

#Qatar# Islamic #Bank #offers #certificates of deposit after Q2 outflow – Nasdaq

The Qatar Islamic Bank aims to boost its deposit base by offering certificates of deposit in Qatari riyals and US$, after it was hit by an outflow of money due to sanctions against Qatar by its neighbouring Gulf countries. The bank said this weekend, that it was offering 1 and 2 year CDs in its 2nd series of such papers. Its first series was launched End of 2015. Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Bahrain cut diplomatic and transport ties with Qatar beginning of June this year, accusing the country of supporting terrorism. This prompted some firms and individuals from those states to pull money out of the Qatari banks. As a result, deposits in the Qatari banks shrank 1.8 % from the previous month in June. Qatar Islamic Bank was particularly hard hit, with its customer deposits falling to US$26.6 billion at end of June, according to its financial statements.

Why we’ve not paid #dividends yet – #JAIZ #Bank CEO

Malam Hassan Usman, CEO of JAIZ Bank, perfected a partnership with Borno State government on the reconstruction of the state economy.
Usman said, that the fourth branch of JAIZ Bank had been opened in Nigerias Maiduguri about five years ago. And it has so far been getting the strong support of the state government since the branch was opened. So he was in Nigeria to explore the ways and means to reciprocate this kind gesture by the state government. His bank wants to help Governor Kashim Shettima in all his efforts to turn things around, especially now that peace and normalcy are gradually being restored in Maiduguri and the entire state.
JAIZ bank has launched a programme, which is being implemented since the beginning of the rainy season, to provide small-holder farmers with inputs. It is working with the coordinator as well as the private sector partner for the state to provide the seeds, fertilizer and other inputs to the partner. The idea of the state government is to start with 5,000 farmers, which it wants to empower at this initial phase of the programme.

Syndicate content