Africa

Learn about the interest free Islamic Banking

The growth of the Islamic finance industry has generated considerable interest and discussion in the financial world markets in recent years. According to a Senior Lecturer at the University of Nairobi School of Business Abdulatif Essajee, lack of information has inhibited the growth of the sector in Kenya. He projects a 25% growth in the coming years. The fastest growing segment in the world is the Issuance of Islamic bonds (Sukuk). In Kenya, the fastest growing segment is Islamic banking.

#Ivory Coast returns to sovereign #sukuk market, after #Togo debut

Ivory Coast plans to complete a sale of 150 billion CFA francs ($263 million) worth of Islamic bonds, following Togo's debut sale of sovereign sukuk launched last month. The two West African nations join Senegal in tapping the market for sukuk, expanding the use of Islamic financing options outside the Middle East and Southeast Asia. The Ivory Coast will sell the 7-year sukuk using ijara with the subscription period closing on Aug. 31. This represents the second phase of a 300 billion CFA franc sukuk programme set up last year by the Ivory Coast. Togo plans to complete the sale of its sukuk later this week, aiming to raise 150 billion CFA franc with a 10-year maturity and a 6.5% yield. The lead arranger for both the Togo and Ivory Coast sukuk is the Islamic Corporation for the Development of the Private Sector (ICD).

Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) Releases Categorization System for “Non-interest Islamic Microfinance Banks”

The Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN) recently released a new categorization system for "Non-Interest Islamic Microfinance Banks" (NIMFBs). CBN organized NIMFBs into three categories: "Unit", "state" and "national". Unit NIMFBs must have a minimum capital of NGN 20 million (USD 71,000) and may open one branch location within the same municipality as the organization’s headquarters. State NIMFBs may operate in one state if they maintain minimum capital of NGN 200 million (USD 350,000). Institutions in this category may open multiple branches in the state within which their headquarters are registered. A national NIMFB is permitted to operate in any state or territory of Nigeria so long as it holds NGN 2 billion (USD 7 million) in capital.

#Sukuk and Aregbesola’s education story

The State of Osun in southwestern Nigeria raised a sukuk bond worth 10 billion naira ($62 mn) from the capital market to fund educational development. After the recent trend of Eurobond issuance by African countries, Osun’s offering was sowing the seeds for more African sukuk. Prior to Osun, only Gambia and Sudan had issued local-currency short-term domestic notes. Osun's Governor Rauf Aregbesola believes that the potential of Islamic finance can also attract investors from the Middle East. Osun State’s planned multi-billion naira sukuk fund for education represents Nigeria’s most ambitious attempt to promote Islamic finance.

Understanding the #Sukuk fund for education in Osun

The State of Osun in southwestern Nigeria raised a sukuk bond worth ten billion naira ($62 mn) from the capital market to fund educational development. After the recent trend of Eurobond issuance by African countries, Osun’s offering was sowing the seeds for more African sukuk. Prior to Osun, only Gambia and Sudan had issued local-currency short-term domestic notes. Osun's Governor Rauf Aregbesola believes that the potential of Islamic finance can also attract investors from the Middle East. Osun State’s planned multi-billion naira sukuk fund for education represents Nigeria’s most ambitious attempt to promote Islamic finance.

The ins and outs of #IslamicFinance

In #South Africa First National Bank (FNB), Al Baraka and HBZ Bank are the only financial institutions offering Islamic banking services. These banks offer a range of Islamic cheque accounts, Islamic savings accounts and Islamic investment accounts as well as vehicle, property and asset finance. CEO of FNB Islamic Banking Amman Muhammad says the bank has seen a consistent rise in the number of South Africans taking up the bank’s transactional banking and investment, vehicle and property finance products irrespective of faith. Customers are looking for an alternative banking form and FNB can offer a principles-based approach. Muhammad says the normal regulatory and risk rules apply to all Islamic banking products.

Does #Somaliland Need Islamic Banking System?

Somaliland's President has signed the Central Banking Act into law. According to Central Bank Governor Abdi Dirir the Commercial Banking Act will be passed in the next three to four months.
Back in 2012 the financial sector agreed to have a Dual Banking system where both Conventional and Islamic banking systems operate in the country. However, the Commercial Banking Act is more than four years overdue. Economically, Somaliland's longterm competitiveness can only be ensured by introducing the Dual Banking System in the country.

#Somaliland: Does Somaliland Need Islamic Banking System or Dual Banking System?

Somaliland's President has signed the Central Banking Act into law. According to Central Bank Governor Abdi Dirir the Commercial Banking Act will be passed in the next three to four months.
Back in 2012 the financial sector agreed to have a Dual Banking system where both Conventional and Islamic banking systems operate in the country. However, the Commercial Banking Act is more than four years overdue. Economically, Somaliland's longterm competitiveness can only be ensured by introducing the Dual Banking System in the country.

Gulf African Bank: Why we don't lend to casinos, breweries

In #Kenya the Gulf African Bank has ambitious expansion plans for the local market. The bank, which is so far only represented in five counties, plans to open ten new branches between 2016 and 2017. Follwoing Sharia rules, the bank does not finance casinos, breweries and anything that is hazardous to the human body. Gulf African Bank is stable and prepared to increase core capital which now stands at Sh3.8 billion. At the end of the year the bank's capital will be above Sh4 billion, while by 2017 above Sh5 billion.

Jaiz Bank: Non-interest banking services not for Muslims only

The Central Bank of Nigeria recently issued a national licence to Jaiz Bank. The bank commenced the first phase of its rollout with branches in Lagos, Port Harcourt, Ibadan and Ilorin and shortly will be present in all the states of the Federation. Jaiz Bank has recently concluded a Rights Issue, which raised its capital to N15 bn and the issue was oversubscribed by about 3%. According to Deputy Managing Director Mahe Abubakar the target is to raise the capital base of N25 bn before the end of the year. This will position the bank to compete efficiently in this highly competitive sub-sector of the economy. There are some people that misunderstand the concept of non-interest banking, but Jaiz Bank is open to all Nigerians, irrespective of their religions.

ASSAFAA BANK recrute des Directeurs d’Agences Finance Participative

Dar Assafaa se prépare à devenir ASSAFAA BANK, une banque participative qui exercera conformément aux dispositions de la nouvelle loi bancaire. Dans ce cadre, Dar Assafaa recrute des Directeurs d’Agences sur les villes de Tétouan, Rabat, Laâyoune, Dakhla, Tanger et Casablanca. Dar Assafaa est la première institution financière marocaine mettant à la disposition du public des formules de financement basées exclusivement sur les produits alternatifs.

Finance islamique: le #Sénégal lance un deuxième #sukuk de 150 milliards de F CFA

Le Sénégal a lancé cette semaine son deuxième emprunt obligataire sous la forme de sukuk. L’opération consiste en la levée de 150 milliards de F CFA (228,6 millions d’euros), à travers l’émission de 15 millions de parts d’une valeur nominale de 10 000 F CFA, sur le marché financier de l’Union économique et monétaire ouest-africaine (UEMOA). La période de souscription de cette levée de fonds s’étend sur un mois (du 20 au 19 juillet). Elle offre une marge annuelle de profit de 6 % avec une maturité de 10 ans.

#HE MO IBRAHIM PRIZE FOR AFRICAN LEADERSHIP HAS NO WINNER YET AGAIN

On Thursday, the Mo Ibrahim foundation announced that its prestigious Mo Ibrahim Prize for Outstanding African Leadership and Governance will have no winner for 2015. This makes it the fifth year this prize has gone unclaimed since its inception in 2006.
In a statement issued by the Chairman of the foundation, Mo Ibrahim, he agreed with this verdict. “When we launched the prize ten years ago, we deliberately set a very high bar.” The Sudanese-British mobile communications entrepreneur and billionaire founded the foundation with a clear objective: to encourage better governance in Africa based on the belief that governance lays at the heart of tangible and shared improvements in the equality of life of African citizens. However, this recent announcement means that a number of revered heads of states such as Emilio Guebuza (Mozambique) and Jakaya Kikwete of Tanzania, both widely credited with the sharp reduction of poverty in their respective states, and presiding over periods of notable economic success, have been overlooked for this year’s prize.
The Award has now been unclaimed more times than won

World’s leading financial institutions in Hall of Shame for #investments in #cluster munitions producers

From Canada, CI Financial, Manulife Financial, Royal Bank of Canada and Sun Life Financial are also included in the Hall of Shame. Jointly, these Canadian financial institutions invested US$565 million in cluster munitions producers between June 2012 and April 2016.

The report by Dutch peace organisation PAX was released today in Ottawa, together with the Cluster Munition Coalition and Mines Action Canada, to put pressure on Canada and other governments to put an end to these investments.

“It is an absolute outrage that financial institutions are investing billions into companies that produce weapons which are banned under international law”, says Suzanne Oosterwijk, author of the PAX report. “Canada has also banned these weapons. It is time for financial institutions to stop disregarding the international norm with these explosive investments into producers of illegal weapons that maim and kill civilians.”

Finance islamique: Des avantages à saisir

Le 4e Forum international sur la finance islamique s’est tenu les 2 et 3 juin à Dakar sous le thème: La finance islamique au service du Plan Sénégal émergent (PSE). Ministre Abdoul Aziz Tall a dit que les finances islamiques constituent une solution idéale pour accompagner le processus de réalisation des projets structurants du PSE. Le ministre cite entre autres secteurs prioritaires, l’agriculture, les infrastructures, l’accès des petites et moyennes entreprises (PME), les services sociaux de base.
Selon Mohammed Moustapha Bintubé de la Jaiz Bank le Sénégal constitue un terreau fertile pour l’émergence d’une finance islamique forte.

Jaiz Bank appoints Usman, MD

Hassan Usman has been appointed as the new Managing Director of Jaiz Bank. The decision of the Board of Directors was reached after a rigorous selection exercise. Hassan Usman takes over from Mahe Abubakar who has acted as MD since December 2015. Mr. Usman had previously acted as Managing Director in 2013. The Bank recently obtained a National Operating License from the Central Bank of Nigeria (CBN). This will enable it to spread across all the 36 states of the Federation.

Emir Sanusi Lauds Jaiz Bank’s N700m Profit

In #Nigeria the emir of Kano, Muhammad Sanusi II, has lauded Jaiz Bank for declaring a profit of over N700 million in the four years of its operation. The bank's managing director Mahe Abubakar Mahmoud disclosed that the Bank had a total balance sheet size of N65 billion by May 31, 2016. He explained that customers’ deposit stood at N50 billion, while the shareholders fund stood at N15 billion, making the bank worth N65 billion. Abubakar said the bank was expanding its branches across the nation, with four additional branches in Kano and the neighbouring states.

What’s hindering Islamic finance growth in #Kenya?

Kenya has a higher percentage of Christians compared to Muslims, but this country is seeing a surge in Islamic financing. According to Rahma Hassan Hersi, Managing Partner at Awal Consulting, the lack of regulations is deterring potential growth. There is a need to address this issue in tandem with the central bank. There is also very limited expertise. The penetration of Islamic finance in Kenya is estimated at 2% with a limited number of banks and insurance companies playing in that space.

#Uganda: 'Develop Islamic Products'

In Uganda the outgoing minister of Gender and Social Development has advised commercial banks to urgently develop products for Islamic Banking. Muruli Mukasa said the parliament passed the law and the all the communities in Uganda have accepted this model of banking. The Financial Institutions Bill 2015 paved way for the introduction of three new products: Islamic Banking, Bancassurance and Agency Banking. But Bank of Uganda still has to issue regulations that will guide commercial banks on how to manage the new form of banking.

Commercial banks to issue sharia compliant #bonds

Islamic banking in #Uganda will broaden government financing options and will ease its borrowing from the private sector, through the Sukuk bonds. According to the managing director of ABL Dunamis, Abubaker Mayanja, Sukuk funding will be available for government infrastructure projects; as long as they meet sharia requirements and the funds are invested directly into the project. He said the bonds will be issued by all commercial banks, regardless of whether they are Muslim founded or not.

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